Stewart Downing Birthday, Date of Birth

Stewart Downing

Stewart Downing (born 22 July 1984) is an English professional footballer who plays for Championship club Blackburn Rovers. He has played most of his career as a winger, where he operates predominantly on the left-hand side, though he can play on the right and go inside on to his stronger left foot. Downing has played more recently as an attacking midfielder.

Downing started his career at Middlesbrough, where after a loan at Sunderland, he became a key part of the team, winning the League Cup in 2004 and helping them to the UEFA Cup final two years later. In 2009, after Boro's relegation, he joined Aston Villa for an initial £10 million, then moved on to Liverpool for twice that amount two years later, again winning the League Cup in 2012. He played for two seasons at West Ham United before returning to Middlesbrough. In 2019, he was released by Middlesbrough after 404 total appearances, and signed for Blackburn.

A full international from 2005 to 2014, Downing earned 35 caps for England. He was included in the nation's squads that reached the quarter-finals at the 2006 FIFA World Cup and UEFA Euro 2012.

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Birthday, Date of Birth
Sunday, July 22, 1984
Place of Birth
Middlesbrough
Age
37
Star Sign

The July 22, 1984 was a Sunday under the star sign of . It was the 203 day of the year. President of the United States was Ronald Reagan.

If you were born on this day, you are 37 years old. Your last birthday was on the Thursday, July 22, 2021, 2 days ago. Your next birthday is on Friday, July 22, 2022, in 362 days. You have lived for 13,516 days, or about 324,388 hours, or about 19,463,308 minutes, or about 1,167,798,504 seconds.

Some people who share this birthday:

22nd of July 1984 News

News as it appeared on the front page of the New York Times on July 22, 1984

FOLLOW-UP ON THE NEWS ; Vanishing Lake

Date: 22 July 1984

By Mervyn Rothstein

Mervyn Rothstein

For a half century, people went to Tillson Lake to swim, boat, fish or just dangle their feet in the water. Then, last July, Tillson Lake disappeared.

Full Article

FOLLOW-UP ON THE NEWS ; Barber at Carlyle

Date: 22 July 1984

By Mervyn Rothstein

Mervyn Rothstein

In 1931, Joseph Miceli opened a barbershop at the Carlyle Hotel on Madison Avenue. For 52 years, he cut the hair of the rich and the famous.

Full Article

Reagan News Parley Set for Tuesday Night

Date: 22 July 1984

AP

President Reagan let it be known Friday that he would hold a news conference Tuesday, the day before he begins a three-state campaign trip. Reporters asked Mr. Reagan for his reaction to Walter F. Mondale's speech accepting the Democratic Presidential nomination, and the President replied ''Save it for Tuesday night.'' The White House press office confirmed the plans. Mr. Reagan's last news conference was held June 14.

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FOLLOW-UP ON THE NEWS ; Park Ave. Deli

Date: 22 July 1984

By Mervyn Rothstein

Mervyn Rothstein

Kyu-Sung Choi, a Korean immigrant, thought it would be a good idea to open a 24-hour delicatessen at Park Avenue and 75th Street. Many residents disagreed.

Full Article

BRIDGE: GOOD NEWS MET WITH ROAR AT NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS

Date: 23 July 1984

By Alan Truscott

Alan Truscott

A roar of delight from 2,000 bridge players swept the playing area here Saturday night on the announcement of the release of Edith Rosenkranz, who had been kidnapped Thursday night. The sound had sunk to a whisper this morning. For all but a handful of the players, the Summer National Championships of the American Contract Bridge League were in their final day at the Sheraton Washington Hotel.

Full Article

COMPUTER GRAPHICS ENLIVEN THE SCREEN

Date: 22 July 1984

By Alex Ward

Alex Ward

This Friday, ABC Sports will begin 180 hours of television coverage of the Summer Olympic Games in Los Angeles. A lot of what viewers will see during that time - that is, when sprinters aren't sprinting, hurdlers aren't hurdling and someone isn't selling beer or radial tires - will be ''graphics,'' a vast array of colorful visual images ranging from the familiar, five-ring Olympic logo (with the letters ABC intertwined) to animated diagrams of the 400-meter medley event in swimming. For the past three years a team of artists and engineers has been cloistered on the fifth floor of the ABC studios at 70th Street and Broadway, preparing first for the Winter Olympics last February in Sarajevo and then the summer Games. For up to 20 hours a day, they have been assembling words, pictures and symbols on machines with space-age names like the Quantel Paintbox, the Dubner CDC (for Character Background Generator) and Chyron. Some of the resulting images turn somersaults a gold medal gymnast would be proud of.

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EX-PUBLISHER SAYS MOON CHURCH RAN NEWSPAPER

Date: 23 July 1984

By Susan F. Rasky

Susan Rasky

The Washington Times, the capital's unabashedly conservative ''other paper,'' is once again the unwelcome subject of articles on its own front page. The man who, until two weeks ago, was The Washington Times's top executive has charged that the newspaper has fallen under the editorial control of the Unification Church, which is headed by the Rev. Sun Myung Moon. The allegations add fuel to a controversy that has dogged the paper since its inception two and a half years ago. As the self-proclaimed conservative alternative to The Washington Post, the newspaper has fought an uphill battle to convince readers that it is an independent news source despite its ownership by News World Communications, the publishing arm of Mr. Moon's movement.

Full Article

TALK THAT ILLUMINATES THE HEADLINES

Date: 22 July 1984

By John Corry

John Corry

For more than 17 years, a very long time in television, ''Washington Week in Review'' has been a survivor. What it does it does better than anyone, and while public-affairs programs on the networks and on the rest of public television may come and go, ''Washington Week in Review'' carries on, just getting better and better. Its format, meanwhile, could hardly be simpler; some of the boys (there are women, but when a woman is on the program she is one of the boys, too) sit around a table and talk about the news. The talk is not necessarily witty, although always it is informed, and the boys, who are newspaper reporters, seem genuinely interested in what one another is saying. Actually, this is the secret of their success. The boys seem to like one another, and when they have a particularly good night, viewers imagine that they pop across the street after the program to have a few beers and keep the discussion going.

Full Article

SUPPORT AWAITS MISS AMERICA AT HOME

Date: 22 July 1984

By Esther B. Fein

Esther

The flowers started arriving at the Williams house on Friday, with cards from friends wishing the family love and courage. The cameras and the reporters came about the same time, and today they were still camped in front of the house with the brass doorplate that reads ''Home of Miss America.'' The only person, it seemed, who had not been to the house was Vanessa Williams, the reigning Miss America, who on Friday was given 72 hours to resign because she had posed for nude photographs that Penthouse magazine intends to publish in its September issue. ''She's away from here in a secure place, where she can rest,'' Miss Williams's father, Milton, said today. ''She was shocked when she heard the news and she became depressed. But we were able to see her briefly last night and we gave her a good hug.''

Full Article

BRITISH CENTER MONITORS SOVIET ATTACKS ON RELIGION

Date: 22 July 1984

By Kenneth A. Briggs

Kenneth Briggs

When major Western news agencies reported two weeks ago that the Soviet dissident Andrei D. Sakharov was being injected with drugs in a Soviet psychiatric hospital, the source of the unofficial information was an organization here that monitors abuses of religious rights in Communist countries. The center is Keston College, which was founded by an Anglican priest, the Rev. Michael Bourdeaux, to study and report accounts of religious persecution in those countries. Strictly speaking, the center's work would not ordinarily include reporting on the plight of Dr. Sakharov, a nonbeliever, but the report indicated how its extensive network overlaps with other human rights information channels. The center publishes a journal, ''Religion in Communist Lands,'' a newsletter and the Keston News Service and can send bulletins over telex equipment in the case of emergency news such as that on Dr. Sakharov.

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